Research Articles

June 08, 2015

Duke University Study Finds Helminths are Beneficial to the Gut Biome Promoting More Good Bacteria and Less Bad

Acting on this discovery could have a profound affect on human health. The idea that from the ecosystem of the human body is leading to inflammation and disease is gaining widespread acceptance. This loss of diversity, known as “biome depletion”, is caused by a variety of factors in modern society and has an effect on every aspect of our body’s development and function, including our brain’s development and function. Most attention among scientists and the media alike has focused on the microbiome, the microorganisms or germs in our biome. However, a substantial body of experimental evidence points toward the presence or absence of larger organisms, helminths or worms, as having a generally more global effect on the body’s function, including alteration in the microbiome.

May 24, 2015

Study Finds Autism-Mercury Link Through Elevated Antibodies to Critical Brain Proteins

A study published in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology found indicators of autoimmunity to critical brain proteins associated with mercury exposure in children with autism. The authors, Gehan Ahmed Mostafa and Laila Yousef AL-Ayadhi at the Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University,  in Cairo, Egypt and the Autism Research and Treatment Center in the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, at King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, respectively, hypothesize that mercury might play a causative role in some cases of autism through increased levels of antibodies to myelin basic protein, or MBP.

April 08, 2015

SafeMinds Funded Research Discovers that Increased Biome Diversity Produces Healthier, Smarter Immune System Responses

Allergy and Autoimmunity Decreases, Without Compromising Immune Response: Conventional wisdom in modern medicine has assumed that a necessary consequence of blocking allergies and autoimmune reactions is immune system suppression, which in turn causes patients to be more vulnerable to other infections and cancers. A new study published today in PLOS ONE by Duke University researchers, and funded in part by the Coalition of SafeMinds, found that increasing biodiversity in the body via biome enrichment, known to decrease allergies and autoimmune reactions, is not immune suppressive. This discovery holds great promise to treat autoimmune diseases successfully without compromising appropriate immune responses.

March 22, 2015

SafeMinds Research for Autism Health

SafeMinds is dedicated to addressing the epidemic of autism. The SafeMinds Research for Autism Health highlights the recent science findings that can help you change practices to lower the risk or severity of autism. To your health, and those you love! Maternal Mercury Exposure A study in Environmental Health Perspectives by Emily C. Somers and […]

March 19, 2015

What’s Good for the Gut is Good for the Brain: A New Perspective on Autism

A global scientific conference on gut microbiota took place this week in Spain. Presenter Elaine Hsiao explained that autism is often marked by GI disturbance and in an animal model of autism, symptoms can be reversed with microbiome rebalancing.  What’s good for the gut is good for the brain: A new perspective on autism Read more here.

May 22, 2014

IMFAR – Research Needs to Improve Lives of Those Living with Autism

The International Meeting for Autism Research, commonly known as IMFAR, just concluded its annual three-day conference on May 17, 2014.  SafeMinds Board and Research Committee Member, Laurette Janak, reviewed the Autism Speaks roadmap of the conference to see what she missed out on. The roadmap can be found here. “Autism Speaks began the conference with […]

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons